Hydrogen Cylinder Leak

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A hydrogen cylinder was initially located in an adjacent laboratory, with tubing going through the wall into the laboratory in use. When the cylinder was moved to the laboratory in use, a required leak check was not performed. Unfortunately, a leak had developed that was sufficient to cause an accumulation of hydrogen to a level above the Lower Flammability Limit. The hydrogen ignited when a computer power plug was pulled from an outlet. The exact configuration of the leak location and the outlet plug is unknown.

Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank Failure

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A liquid hydrogen tank’s rupture disc failed prematurely, which caused the tank to vent its entire gas contents through the tank’s vent stack. Venting was very loud and formed a condensed moisture cloud visible from the top of the stack. Liquid air was also visible coming off the stack. Venting ceased after approximately 5 minutes. On-site staff called the fire department, which arrived promptly and evacuated the area. Normal operations resumed after the Fire Department was able to determine there were no unsafe conditions.

Hydrogen Tubing Leak

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A facility uses small crucibles to heat precious metals within a fume hood, with natural gas as the fuel source for the Bunsen burner. Hydrogen is fed into the crucible at low pressure (<20 psi) to control the atmosphere within the vessel in order to prevent oxidation. The hydrogen is routed through a manifold with flexible tubing, which is connected to a ceramic tip and fitted into the crucible through a small opening in the crucible's lid. The hydrogen is consumed in the process. The facility believes that the hydrogen tubing developed a leak which eventually ignited.

Hydrogen Cylinder Fire in Laboratory

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

An employee of an incubator company that was working in a university-owned laboratory facility was checking the hydrogen pressure through the main valve on a hydrogen cylinder. The regulator on this cylinder had not been properly closed. Hydrogen escaped through the regulator and was ignited. The fire was contained in the laboratory and extinguished by the building's fire sprinkler system before fire crews arrived. There were no injuries, and damage estimates were not available.

Ammonia Tank Leak

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A laboratory had an incident with an ammonia tank. When the valve was opened, the packing in the valve apparently "moved," and a faint ammonia smell was noticed. The tank was returned to the supplier.

Incorrect Hydrogen Gas Bottle Connected to Glove Box

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

An individual inadvertently connected a pure hydrogen gas bottle to a chamber/glove box as opposed to a 10% hydrogen (in nitrogen) bottle that should have been used. [The wrong bottle had mistakenly been delivered, and the inexperienced individual did not know the difference.] The hydrogen concentration increased within the chamber to about 9%. Since there was insufficient oxygen in the chamber to support combustion, the hydrogen did not burn, and was quickly diluted with nitrogen.

Unintentional Uncoupling of Compressed Gas Quick-Disconnect Fitting

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

While filling a sample cylinder with compressed hydrogen gas, a quick-disconnect coupler fitting came loose within a stainless steel laboratory hood, allowing a small purge of the hydrogen gas to escape directly into the hood through ~1/4-inch Tygon tubing. The stainless steel quick-disconnect fitting struck the stainless steel bottom of the laboratory hood and the hydrogen gas caught fire. It is not known what caused the hydrogen gas to catch fire.

Small Hydrogen Explosion Inside a MOCVD System Burn Box

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

While attempting to light the hydrogen flare inside a Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) system burn box, a small explosion occurred, blowing the back section of the burn box off. Hydrogen flow was shut down immediately, and this MOCVD operation was suspended. Researchers made the determination that this was a minor incident and there were no injuries.

Hydrogen Leak from Flow Meter

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A hydrogen gas detector on the ground floor of a building registered the release of a small amount of hydrogen gas and actuated automatic alarms both at the fire department and in one of its buildings. Additionally, interlocks connected to the gas detector completely shut down the experiment. Upon hearing the alarm, all occupants (about 6) promptly left the building. Fire department personnel are housed in the trailer next to a building and responded within one minute. They tested the atmosphere within the building, reset the gas detector, and secured the alarm at 9:15.

Small Electrical Fire Resulting from Improper Equipment Configuration

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

An employee noticed an unusual smell in a fuel cell laboratory. A shunt inside experimental equipment overheated and caused insulation on conductors to burn. Flames were approximately one inch high and very localized. The employee de-energized equipment and blew out the flames. No combustible material was in the vicinity of the experiment. The fire was contained within the fuel cell and resulted in no damage to equipment.

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