Hydrogen Leak from Flow Meter

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A hydrogen gas detector on the ground floor of a building registered the release of a small amount of hydrogen gas and actuated automatic alarms both at the fire department and in one of its buildings. Additionally, interlocks connected to the gas detector completely shut down the experiment. Upon hearing the alarm, all occupants (about 6) promptly left the building. Fire department personnel are housed in the trailer next to a building and responded within one minute. They tested the atmosphere within the building, reset the gas detector, and secured the alarm at 9:15.

Concerns Related to Hydrogen Bottle Rupture

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A 2000-psia-rated gas cylinder (nominal size 10"x1 1/2") was being filled with hydrogen to a target pressure of 1500 psia. The cylinder suffered a failure at an indicated pressure of 1500 psia during filling. Investigation of the failure subsequently revealed that a faulty digital readout had allowed the cylinder to be over-pressurized. There were no safety consequences due to the failure and no damage to the facility or equipment. The cylinder was being filled in a test vault that was specially designed for the high-pressure burst testing of pressure vessels and components.

Hydrogen Hose Fire

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A pinhole at the base of a hand-held hydrogen torch, allowed hydrogen to leak. In the process of lighting a second torch, the leaking hydrogen was ignited. The operator, being startled by the "pop" of the lighted hydrogen allowed the #2 torch to drop and hang by its hose support approximately 6" from the floor. The hydrogen and oxygen hoses on the #1 torch were burned through and hung approximately 12" from the floor. The free burning #1 hose burned the #2 hydrogen and oxygen hose assembly through, causing both hoses assemblies to burn without valve control.

Storage Tank CLFL Analyzer Out of Limits

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A waste pretreatment tank operator was performing surveillance rounds on a tank and found the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) Analyzer sample flow reading 1.4 cubic feet per hour (CFH). The Operational Safety Requirements (OSR) document required flow range is 1.5 CFH to 2.5 CFH. The Limiting Condition for Operation was immediately entered and the tank operator adjusted the flow into the required surveillance range.

Storage Tank LFL Analyzer Reading Out of Surveillance Limits

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

As a prerequisite to a storage tank slurry pump run, a tank operator identified a Lower Flammability Limit (LFL) Analyzer surveillance reading to the control room that was out of limits low. The reading was a negative zero % LFL indication (-0 % LFL). The tank operator roundsheet limits are 0 to 10% LFL. The "null" value (value read on analyzer when air with 0% LFL is drawn through the analyzer) as directed by the LFL Analyzer loop calibration procedure is set between 0 and 4% LFL.

Swagelok Fittings Under High Pressure

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A shop supervisor determined that a second shift would be necessary to complete some priority work on the spare hydrogen mitigation pump. The work scope for the shift would be dedicated to continued fabrication of designed tubing runs, repairs to existing tubing with known leaks and pressure testing of other various tubing runs. The shift craft complement would include three pipe fitters, one welder, one QC inspector and a shift supervisor.

Hydrogen Furnace Leak

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

The hydrogen feed system for the furnaces inside a pit furnace developed a leak. The leak was on the hydrogen dryer inside a shack attached to a building. The leak vented 200 psig hydrogen into the shack. The hydrogen low-pressure alarm sounded. No furnace operators were present at the time. An estimated 10,000 standard cubic feet of hydrogen vented. T

Hydrogen Make Up Compressor Piping Hole

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

During inspection of a hydrogen make-up compressor, it was discovered that a 1/4” stainless steel screw and nut that mounted a temperature gauge to a stainless steel pipe was resting against the side of a schedule 160 high-pressure hydrogen pipe. Constant vibration of the process equipment had caused the bolt to rub a hole in the high-pressure suction piping, resulting in the release of make-up hydrogen. The pipe was out of sight, and the problem was identified by an employee who heard the whistling sound of escaping hydrogen. The compressor was taken offline and depressurized.

Degradation of Safety-Significant Valve

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

The valve stem for a funnel valve to a solution neutralization tank was found to be separated from the body of the valve. This valve is used for purging hydrogen gas from the vessel. The functional classification of this valve is safety-significant. The "as-found" condition of the affected valve prevented the valve from performing its intended design function.

Check Valve Shaft Blow-Out due to Hydrogen Embrittlement

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

Several workers sustained minor injuries and millions of dollars worth of equipment was damaged by an explosion after a shaft blew out of a check valve. The valve failure rapidly released a large vapor cloud of hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases which subsequently ignited.Certain types of check and butterfly valves can undergo shaft-disk separation and fail catastrophically or "blow-out," causing toxic and/or flammable gas releases, fires, and vapor cloud explosions. Such failures can occur even when the valves are operated within their design limits of pressure and temperature.

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