Severe vibrations caused by broken low-pressure turbine blades damaged the main turbine generator at a nuclear power plant. These vibrations also caused multiple hydrogen leaks at equipment connections to the generator, resulting in hydrogen flames outside of the generator casing that caused minimal damage to the facility. Hydrogen is used to internally cool the plant's electric generators. Water from the fire suppression system and oil released from the turbine lube oil system during the event were contained within the plant, resulting in no impact to the environment. The plant's nuclear systems were unaffected by the event.

A previously identified generator hydrogen gas leakage into the stator cooling water system exceeded the predetermined maximum operational allowance and the nuclear plant was shut down from 100 percent power in accordance with plant operating procedures. The leak was identified by monitoring the stator water cooling system detraining tank. Following reactor shut down and generator rotor removal, a small hole was located in the collector end winding area of a slot on the top stator bar. A small particle of carbon steel (estimated to be 2 mm/0.078 inch by 0.6 mm/0.023 inch) is believed to have caused the damage. The source of the carbon steel particle was either foreign material introduced during previous generator internal work or from a phenomenon called "back-of-core burning view more

Hydrogen and water leakage in the main generator stator cooling water (SCW) equipment forced two separate shutdowns of a nuclear plant in a three-month period. Manufacturer weld defects on the SCW exciter end ring header are the likely cause for the hydrogen leakage.

The first nuclear plant shutdown was initiated in mid-May when an SCW leak internal to the main generator was confirmed. Events that led up to the shutdown decision started three days earlier and included an upward trend in stator coil temperatures. After two days of an elevated temperature trend, an SCW tank high-pressure alarm indicated hydrogen leakage. Per alarm response procedure, the operators vented the tank. Hydrogen leakage was determined to have increased from about 300 to 1400 ft3/day with stator water view more