Small Glass Ampoule of Aluminum Hydride (Alane) Ruptures After Transit

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A small research sample of approximately 5 grams of aluminum hydride (alane) doped with 2-3 mol % TiCl3 contained within a glass ampoule ruptured after transit while stored in an office cabinet. The rupture was attributed to over-pressurization caused by hydrogen gas buildup within the sample over a four-month period. The glass ampoule, contained within a 0.2-inch thick cardboard shipping tube, was not a pressure-rated container. The rupture resulted in glass chards penetrating the protective cardboard shipping tube.

Small Glass Vial of Aluminum Hydride Compound Ruptures in Glove Box

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A closed 20-mL glass scintillation vial containing approximately 5 grams of an aluminum hydride compound ruptured and shattered, likely due to pressure buildup after 6 weeks of storage. The glass vial with aluminum hydride compound was stored inside a closed plastic box. The plastic box with vial was stored within an air-free glove box at room temperature. When the glass vial ruptured, the vial was contained within the plastic box; however, the plastic box door was forced slightly ajar. The ruptured containers and internal materials were fully contained within the glove box.

Fatal Accident due to Bacterial Hydrogen Production in Atmospheric Storage Tank

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

A fatal accident took place at an onshore processing facility for slop water from the offshore petroleum industry.

Drilling fluids, or mud, are typically oil-water emulsions consisting of base oil (continuous phase), water (dispersed phase), and emulsifying agents. Used drilling mud, or slop, is mud enriched with water and rock cuttings from drilling --- typically 60-80% water, 10-20% emulated base oil, and 10-20% rock cuttings. The used drilling fluids are collected in slop tanks on oil platforms and later shipped to onshore facilities for further processing.

Two 55-Gallon Drums Rupture due to Over-Pressurization and Release Contents

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

An over-pressurization of two 55-gallon drums of waste phosphoric acid resulted in a material failure of the drum bottoms, releasing the contents of both drums (about 100 gallons) onto the facility floor. The spillage was collected within the sumps that are part of the facility's spill control system. The waste material had been packaged into DOT-specified containers earlier that day and the drums were placed into an assigned storage cell. That evening a staff member heard a noise in the high bay where hazardous wastes are stored.

Hydrogen Gas Explosion in Municipal Refuse Incineration Facility

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

An explosion occurred in a 90-ton-per-day incinerator at a municipal refuse incineration facility. Three workers were seriously burned by high-temperature gas that spouted from the inspection door, and one of them died 10 days later. The accident happened during inspection and repair of the furnace ash chute damper. The workers injected water to remove some blockage, and the water reacted with incinerated aluminum ash to form hydrogen, which caused the explosion.

Hydrogen Explosion in Battery Compartment of Dinner Cruise Boat

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

First responders were dispatched to the waterfront area to investigate a possible explosion on an 85-foot dinner cruise boat that was moored there. Upon arrival, the incident commander noted that nothing out of the ordinary was visible on the exterior of the boat. A crew was sent to the interior of the boat to investigate. The boat was powered by diesel engines and there were no compressed gas cylinders on board.

Release of Stored Hydrogen as Water Temperature Increases

First Name
Andy
Last Name
Piatt

During an external review of the facility safety basis document, it was identified that the accident analysis for the pool cell area hydrogen explosion did not account for release of stored hydrogen from the pool cell water as the temperature of the water increases. The analysis only accounted for the hydrogen generated by radiolysis. A loss of pool cell cooling occurring concurrently with a loss of ventilation would result in a higher concentration of hydrogen in the pool cell area than calculated in the safety basis.

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